Lady Crocodile

‘Your Winnie,’ she mutters, pressing harder with the face wipe. ‘Your dragon, your beautiful dragon girl…’

Sitting before the mirror at her dressing table, she doesn’t recognise the woman staring back at her. There is familiarity in the face, as there is familiarity to be found in anything if a person is subjected to it often enough, but that is all. Still, she keeps looking. She must look, every night, before Seth turns in for bed, desperately studying the features that emerge from beneath her makeup. The ritual of recognition is on-going.

The bedroom is dark, save for the light from the first-floor landing, which spills through the open doorway. It is easier when the bedroom is dark, as though that makes it all right; as though it is acceptable that she cannot properly see herself when she can barely see anything else. Canned laughter carries through the house, and the sound of audience applause, as Seth’s own evening ritual comes to its close. Soon he will ascend through the house, as if chasing the vestigial laughs, the sound of company, until they lead him into the bedroom and are silent.

The evening had begun like any other. Dinner was ready for when Seth returned home from work. She had cooked lamb, rubbed with rosemary and a selection of other herbs. She ate silently while he told her about his day. She nodded when encouraged, smiled when he smiled, laughed at his jokes.

He told her the lamb was nice, that his ‘dragon’s done herself proud with this one.’ They drank wine; his white, hers red. He said the white went with the vegetables. Her palate favoured the red; rich, velveteen flavours in her mouth, against her tongue. She agreed with him regardless.

Seth loves it when she agrees with him. He says it shows their unity, that they are two made into one. ‘In sickness and in health. Till death do we part. My Winnie, my fierce, beautiful dragon girl.’

She turns her attention to her lips next. Pulling a clean tissue free from the box to her right, she dabs it to her mouth, as though kissing it gently good night. Her lips have not kissed anything gently for a long time now. Seth does not like his love gentle, and on the occasions he does press his mouth against hers, it cannot be called a kiss. Once, before all this, he might have kissed her in the proper sense. There had been tenderness then; enough to tempt her from her family home into his arms.

She presses harder, then begins rubbing, until all of the lipstick is gone. Underneath, her lips are thin, and slightly raw. The tissue comes away red and streaky in her hand.

When they had both finished eating dinner, the dragon washed up while her white knight took the wine into the front room. Heat seared her hands as they dipped in and out of the sink. Drowsy with wine and the silky, sudsy water on her skin, she thought things that she had not dared to think before. ‘What ifs’ uncoiled themselves in her mind; fiery thoughts roused and riled.

Staring into her bright, shining eyes in the dressing table mirror, she remembers every slight, every wound, every wicked word intended to belittle her. This is not love, she thinks. She dares to think it again, giving voice to the doubts that have for a long time now been hatching in her head. This is not love. It was never love. She is no better off than when she left home; lost and lonely and unloved by a world that does not know the meaning of the word.

She remembers the feel of his hand against her face, the sound it makes; a ringing slap that sinks beneath the skin and seems to burn. His dragon, scorched!

She thinks of all these things, as she had thought of them at the kitchen sink, her eyes fixed firmly on the wedding ring by the taps. Her hands had moved automatically through the water, her mind caught up in a twister of realisation. So much pain, she thought, so much upset for so little; a small piece of jewellery and their names on a certificate. God, she was sure, played no part in this; an ancient force dead to the modern world. But there were yet more ancient forces, not dead but sleeping, and they stirred now, suffused with heat and hunger –

Tears cling to her long, black lashes, before breaking free and running down her face. Most of her make-up is removed now but she does not stop wiping. She covers all her face from her forehead to her neck, and with every wipe she feels more familiar, less false to her own eyes. And what eyes, she thinks, reaching to rip off her fake lashes. The lids come too, peeled clean above her sockets, revealing mad, majestic orbs underneath.

Silence falls suddenly over the house. As her opened eyes regard themselves in the mirror, she hears Seth at the bottom of the stairs. He comes perhaps to slay her with his lance, to penetrate the folds of her flesh, to pierce her in her most vulnerable place until she is stilled beneath him, and he spent.

She wipes harder, with less care, and it seems to her that every movement sloughs skin from her face. Her flesh smears like concealer, revealing new skin underneath. The tissues tire quickly, turning red and rancid in her hand. Their remains litter the dressing table, and in the mirror, her new face; sharp and scaled. His dragon girl, a woman!

He reaches the top of the stairs, and she senses him on the landing. Then she sees him in the mirror, a silhouette in the doorway. His body blocks the light.

‘You’re cold again.’

‘I’m fine,’ she says, still staring in the mirror.

‘Come off it, I can see you shivering from here.’ Seth moves into the bedroom, his silhouette reappearing by the window. The cross-framed sheet of glass stands open; the bedroom exposed to the black sky, the silver stars swallowed by that blackness so that they barely seem to shine at all. ‘What have I said about leaving this open at night?’

He is still talking but she does not hear. Time seems to stop as she considers him; not Seth but a silhouette, featureless and without meaning. He is nothing. It is nothing. She feels herself shaking as she considers what she has given to him. Every smack scalds her skin, embarrassment sears her cheeks, abuse burning between her thighs until she can barely contain the heat inside her. Her mouth stretches into a silent scream, jaws wide, like the dragons of old. Lipstick and lashes, for lamb!

‘– to make an effort. You know I love you, Winnie? Your knight in shining –’

She rushes at him through the darkness. They stumble into the en-suite, half in and out of the bedroom. His head hits the smooth white of the wash basin and he lies still beneath her. Heat spills from her mouth in hurried words.

‘Lamb,’ she breathes hotly, ‘lipstick and lashes, for lamb!’

His eyes flutter, head lolling on the linoleum, and she wonders if he can see her, if he recognises that she has changed now. Her breath rattles in her throat; a beautiful, crocodilian croak, which seems to say I am a woman and you have wronged me. Then her mouth closes around his face, jaw loose, like that of a great snake. Her teeth sink into his skin and he burns beneath her, this modern knight, this meat, this man.

~ Thomas Brown

© Copyright 2013 Thomas Brown. All Rights Reserved.

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About Thomas Brown

Thomas Brown is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Southampton, where he is exploring the relationship between horror and the sublime in literature. Literary influences include Clive Barker, Poppy Z. Brite and Thomas Ligotti. He writes dark, surreal fiction.

20 responses to “Lady Crocodile”

  1. Karen Soutar says :

    Wow, Thomas! I love and admire your writing so much. The way tension builds in this story to the inevitable conclusion…
    What is it with you and hunger, and food, and people eating flesh..? 😉

    Like

  2. moondustwriter says :

    Love it Thomas
    you carefully unmask the woman that the knight made with his own thoughtlessness
    the end is anticipated but like a fine red wine savored – all the way down

    Like

  3. blazemcrob says :

    I love the way you skillfully weave the past with the present, moving ever onward while the reasons for a lack of love and loneliness are shown festering inside Winnie. There can only be one conclusion, one which you administer so well.

    “And what eyes, she thinks, reaching to rip off her fake lashes. The lids come too, peeled clean above her sockets, revealing mad, majestic orbs underneath.” – my favorite lines in your great tale, sir.

    Blaze

    Like

  4. Sue says :

    Exquisite language

    Like

  5. Joseph Pinto says :

    Thom, I’ve come to expect nothing short of excellence when it comes to your writing. You didn’t disappoint with ‘Lady Crocodile.’

    In my opinion, the sign of an outstanding writer is one who keeps the reader fully engaged & invested in a tale, even if you know where the tale is headed. That is not a knock on your story, of course; I fully realized from the get-go how this was going to play itself out, but because of the rich style you employ, I nonetheless read with eyes wide open, enrapt. I said in one of my own personal blog posts a bit ago that the “magic is in the telling.” ‘Lady Crocodile’ is full of magic.

    Excellent, Thom! Proud you are Damned!

    Like

  6. Tyr Kieran says :

    Tom, I love the perspective of your story. It lends mystery and compassion, but as I approached the end, despite the lack of any clear hints, I began to feel that the reality we see through her eyes may be drastically skewed. Her husband could have been a loving spouse and stand-up guy falling victim to a mentally unstable loved one, but we’ll never know for sure.
    Great work as always, Tom!

    Like

    • Thomas Brown says :

      Tyr – I’m glad you’re questioning our perspective! We get but a glimpse into Winnie’s state of mind; one thousand words is far too few to convey the potential depth of emotion attached to stories of this nature. I’m really looking forward to developing this flash into a fully-fledged story.

      Like

  7. Dan Dillard says :

    THAT was gloriously weird… and I’m not sure if she is a dragon in reality, or if she’s just crazy as hell, driven mad by her white knight who seems to be a bit of an ass. Either way, she won in the end…and I’ll be thinking about this tale (tail?) for a while. Nice job! Dragons rule 🙂

    Like

  8. Nina D'Arcangela says :

    Fiercely written, Thomas! A great deal of pain, anger and hate couched into this little goodie. It comes together beautifully. Your use of metaphor, and outright descriptive of her emotional trauma is magnificently done. Then you’ve added a nasty little, and well deserved, twist at the end. This is a great piece; you’ve taken an ugly subject, woven the words together beautifully, and produced a work of prose to be extremely proud of in Lady Crocodile. Superb writing, Tom, really! 🙂

    Like

  9. A Window Into The Dark says :

    Wow! Had me hooked from the start. Excellently written, painting such vivid images in my mind. Great piece

    Like

  10. A Window Into The Dark says :

    Reblogged this on A Window Into The Dark and commented:
    Gripping

    Like

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