All These Voices

The sound of the tape slides soothingly into Nicholas’ ears. Not the music itself, although that is certainly pleasant, but the mechanical whir of the reels as the tape’s innards wind through the machine. He doubts if he could write so well without the quiet whirring. He doubts if he could write at all with the noise of the world at his window and under the soles of his feet.

The pub beneath his bedsit is busy tonight. Voices slice through the floorboards as though the wooden planks do not exist. He might be sitting at the bar himself, submerged in the chorus of cries and thoughtless laughter: the White Ship on stormy, booze-wracked seas. Pouring a glass of wine he sits back in his chair and drinks.

Sometimes he can make out word-for-word the different conversations at the bar. Drunkenness seems only to increase people’s volume, as though for a few hours the fugue imparts a sixth-sense: a glimpse of more than just the pub, the street, the city, the entire world as it really is. So the patrons below shout and scream, laughing madly into their drinks, looking anywhere but the frightened whites of their friends’ eyes, the hollow blackness of their mouths; the window panes, dewy with the cold empty night.

The unmistakable pop of breaking glass shatters his reverie, followed by a collective cheer. A bottle or a pint glass, perhaps, caught by an elbow or dropped from careless fingers. Putting his feet up on the desk, he breathes in deeply through his nose. Air inflates his lungs, his chest, the narrow curves of his ribs, forcing everything else out of him and away, except for the pinkish blur behind his lowered eyelids and the gentle flutter of the cassette in the player. Exhaling, he concentrates on the sound.

It was a week after he’d moved in before he discovered the tapes, in a locked drawer under the desk. There was no key that he could find but the wood gave easily enough when forced. The drawer has not been the same since.

He found other things in the drawer, besides the tapes: yellowing sheet music scratched with skeletal notes, a ragged doll with faded red hair, a desert of seashells still coated with grit. When he had finished inspecting these things, he let the drawer keep them. As much as he loves music, he cannot read it. If he was in the doll’s place, he would not like to be brought from out of the shadows looking so sad. The shells are sharp, and he finds them repellent in the way all things decayed seem to repulse. Mostly, the drawer tells a story, and he respects that. A hundred possibilities might have led to these cast-offs finding their way into the locked confines of the desk. Who is he to disturb their tale, their private narrative?

Finishing his glass, he pours a second. The wine is cheap but not altogether unpleasant. Downstairs, the party continues to bloom.

When the noise reached new heights one evening last year, he left his room to complain to the owner. Screams echoed up the stairs and down the hallway. Shrieks ricocheted from the walls, laughter bouncing into his ears, over and over. As he moved down the corridor, he heard chanting and a count-down; a human rite reaching completion, a spell to keep another day at bay, or to guide it in, like a pale boat coming to moor. The owner – his landlord – had laughed in his face. He can still remember the bite of the sound in his chest, the cold spittle as it sprayed his cheeks. The argument had been short and one-sided. As ever, Nicholas had not won.

“Why take a room above a pub if you don’t like noise, or a drink now and then?”

“I like a drink,” he had replied. “I drink often. But there’s no excusing the disturbance tonight.”

“It’s a pub,” repeated the landlord, “and it’s New Year’s Eve, for Christ’s sake. This is where people come to make noise. If you don’t like it, you can bloody well leave.”

It is true that he likes a drink while he writes. Sometimes he celebrates a moment’s peace with a finger or two of single malt. On the nights when he cannot hope to hear himself think, let alone lift pen to paper, he knocks back whole bottles of wine; crisp, heady reds that stain his lips and dazzle his tongue before soaring to his stomach and his head. Sometimes, when he is two bottles down, he returns to the broken drawer. He imagines that he can read the music sheets, and that they are the same dulcet sounds drifting from the cassette player. If he is especially drunk, he imagines their script tells of a different sound; the last, sonorous cry of a world beset, heard by some lonely composer, a man not unlike himself, and recorded here in ink where those who chance across it might read of its agony; its submarine moans.

He did not leave, that night on New Year’s Eve, because there was nowhere else for him to go. There is nowhere else when he hears every ragged wheeze, wherever he is; the shuddering breaths of a world on the brink of expiration. As best he can remember he has always heard these sounds. He did not always know what they were, or what it meant to hear the death-rattle of the stones and the trees and the earth, but he felt them all the same, and stood slightly apart from everyone else because of this, while the others ran laughing after one another, or played hopscotch, or made daisy-chains in the grass, oblivious.

A rare few people are not quite so blind. He read about them in newspapers and on the internet, when he still wasted his time with such trivial things. These men and women scrabble through the soil, digging the earth, scattering seeds, which they hope might germinate, take root, become trees and so heal the world that other men and women have made sick. Give a dying man a cushion, feed him painkillers, sit at his bedside and pray for his soul – he will die all the same, trembling alone as the last of his sorry life departs from his veins.

Sometime after midnight the pub falls quiet enough that he can hear his tapes and write. There will always be noise, but at times like this he is not really aware of it; lost in the depths of his literature. Some men and women write to create. Others write from personal angst, or to entertain a crowd, or perhaps to remember who they are, or were at another time. Nicholas does not know much about these things except that he writes to feel.

On paper, darkness shines. Words convey savagery with the finesse of bright bouquets. Language illuminates the broken back of the world, its atrophied limbs, its eyeless face: a rotten leviathan floating in space, quivering with parasites while it sings its last whale-song through an ocean of distant stars, almost inscrutable except by those who dare to pause in their furious lives and, for a moment, listen.

The tapes whir, his pencil scratches, and something not quite happiness but more like contentment simmers in his chest, until he can write no more and, with a slight smile on his wine-stained lips, he climbs into bed, and dreams of sweet oblivion.

~ Thomas Brown

© Copyright 2014 Thomas Brown. All Rights Reserved

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About Thomas Brown

Thomas Brown is a postgraduate researcher at the University of Southampton, where he is exploring the relationship between horror and the sublime in literature. Literary influences include Clive Barker, Poppy Z. Brite and Thomas Ligotti. He writes dark, surreal fiction.

29 responses to “All These Voices”

  1. blazemcrob says :

    Lovely poetic prose, my friend! My favorite paragraph is:

    “On paper, darkness shines. Words convey savagery with the finesse of bright bouquets. Language illuminates the broken back of the world, its atrophied limbs, its eyeless face: a rotten leviathan floating in space, quivering with parasites while it sings its last whale-song through an ocean of distant stars, almost inscrutable except by those who dare to pause in their furious lives and, for a moment, listen.”

    This is why I write and why I write what I do. It is almost as if you ventured into my dreams, captured my soul, and placed it into that short expanse of words.

    Great job, Thomas.

    Blaze

    Like

  2. Nina D'Arcangela says :

    Beautiful, beautiful words chosen so well to build an extremely textured piece, Thomas! Excellent yarn; perfect emotions provoked! Truly lovely my Darkling Prince! 🙂

    Like

  3. Magenta Nero says :

    surreal and sublime, mysterious and very haunting, so beautifully written Thomas.

    Like

  4. Joseph Pinto says :

    Being one who enjoys writing in bars (and drinking lots of wine), this piece particularly struck me, Thomas. But much more than that, you crafted a sublimely intricate tale; each word fit perfectly so. I loved it!

    Like

  5. Craig McGray says :

    Once again, Thomas, you have strung together the perfect blend of words to create a beautiful piece. You have a tremendous talent, my friend! Very well done.

    Like

  6. Craig McGray says :

    Reblogged this on From Bright Minds Come Dark Things and commented:
    A masterfully written piece from Thomas Brown on Pen of the Damned.

    Like

  7. theowllady says :

    Reblogged. This is a wonderful work of art! @v@ ❤

    Like

  8. jonolsonauthor says :

    Once again, Thomas, you’ve created a wonderfully dark piece. As I’ve stated before, I really enjoy your writing style as it has an almost lyrical flow to it. Great job, buddy!

    Like

    • Thomas Brown says :

      Thanks, Jon. We all have our own styles – that is one of the things I love so much about the group. There’s a little something for everyone, I think, and a whole lot in-between.

      Like

  9. zkullis says :

    There are so many aspects of this story that my dark heart loves. I agree with what had already been said. You’ve captured things here that I think ring true to many writers. I buck against a world full of noise – a cacophony of worthless stimuli that threaten to quiet my muse.

    Opinios, commercials, sodding politicians, corporate bastards, shit-for-brains lobyists, and all of the other audible tripe that bombards us day and night, just like the bar downstairs.

    What I wouldn’t do for a tape deck and wine that could silence all of that shit I don’t care about and let me write……

    Superb tale my friend! You nailed it.

    Like

  10. MeliSwenk says :

    Such beautiful and vivid imagery, Thomas! You articulate your vision well. I look forward to reading much more.

    Like

  11. Thomas Brown says :

    Reblogged this on THOMAS BROWN and commented:
    This week it is my turn to share a little writing with Pen of the Damned and our readers. I have written a story about a man who feels out of sorts with the rest of the world; a man who at once feels as though he understands more and less than everyone else; a man who has nothing and wants for nothing else, except perhaps a little peace and quiet. I’m not sure enjoy is the right word, but I hope someone finds it an affecting read.

    Like

  12. jonolsonauthor says :

    Reblogged this on and commented:
    ALL THESE VOICES by Thomas Brown

    Like

  13. moondustwriter says :

    Thomas This really is an exceptional piece. I wonder sometimes where real horror resides on paper or in the writer’s mind…

    Like

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